Welcome. Edgartown News was born from the simple fact that I have ink and Dektol in my veins and I need to write and photograph more than I need air or food, and from my love for this little town where I grew up and raised my family, the town I have left a few times but can't quite shake for good. Here you will find wanderings and musings, photographs and commentary; the people, places, and happenings - past and present - of a small island town: my home town.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Welcome, Button Tub

On Sunday, as promised, the Edgartown Fireman's Association hosted an ice-cream social in honor of the Button tub hand-pumper's installation into its newly built, climate-controlled room at the Edgartown Fire Museum. Dick Kelly emphasized that Sunday's party was what's called a "soft opening;" with the main event - a gala opening of the museum - scheduled for September. It was a fine day for socializing and ice-cream, getting a glimpse of the many good things to come, and for supporting a great project.




Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social

The walls of the Edgartown Fire Museum feature big, beautiful posters that depict some of the history of the EFD. Above is a shot of the old station on Church Street (I had practically forgotten all about that place), the site of today's visitors' center.



Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
This is Edgartown's famous antique hand-pumper, in its new, climate-controlled room. 
The write-up with the display reads:
Button Tub Hand Pumper
This was the third fire apparatus used on Martha's Vineyard. It was made in 1855 by L. Button & Co. of Waterford, NY. Bought by the town of Edgartown for $1,000, it was actively used for over 75 years. The engine drew its water from cisterns scattered around town, and the water pressure needed was produced through manual pumping. It could throw one stream 150 feet; two streams, 125 feet; and three streams, 100 feet high. At full capacity, the engine could pump more than ten barrels per minute. In theory, this would have meant the work of 42 men, although the size of the team 
was usually closer to 30.
The tub was restored by the Edgartown Firemen's Association in 1984.

Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Dick Kelly and Peter Look


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Jesse Maciel with daughter Madison.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Jesse, Madison, and Emily.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Phyllis Brown; Jesse, Madison, and Emily; Peter Look - generations one, three, and four.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Three of the masterminds behind the project: Andrew Kelly, with Peggy and Steve Zablotny, whose Vineyard Haven design firm, Z Studio,  is responsible for the layout and design of the museum.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Maisie Sherman


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
EMT Kate Conde


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Just a few of an estimated 700 fire department patches that have been collected by various members and friends of EFD. The above, specifically, are patches that Dick Kelly has collected from his many trips to Canada. Dick travels with a supply of EFD patches that he trades with other departments.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
The 1927 Mack is a show stopper, everywhere she goes.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Peggy Zablotny enjoys the ride.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Susan Kelly, Steve Zablotny, Dick Kelly, and Khalid Dore.
When Dick Kelly joined the department in 1956, Hose Co. No. 1 was still in service; Dick would spend his first four years as a fireman on this truck.


Edgartown Fire Department, ice cream social
Khalid Dore (Dick Kelly, b.g.)


Riding on Hose Co. No. 1 from Sara Piazza on Vimeo.
Haven't you always wanted to ride on a fire truck?
I had an opportunity to ride on Edgartown Fire Department's 1927 Mack today. It was quite a thrill, especially with the bell ringing and the siren blaring.

2 comments:

  1. I truly enjoy looking through on this website , it holds fantastic blog posts.

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    Replies
    1. Harry, thanks for looking, and thanks for your kind words - much appreciated.

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